TRY YOUR HAND AT

Poppies in
A MEADOW

You tried and here are some of the results

Claire’s painting which featured in the May issue - here is a small selection of your interpretations. To enjoy more click on the Competitions tab.

Thank you to all of you who gave this demonstration a try. The instruction is there for you to follow, but also to use your own interpretation. The results were so impressive. I have chosen these paintings because of their variety of interpretation, not because they were necessarily the best, so please don't be discouraged if yours isn't amongst this group.

If you have any photos for fellow members to paint upload them onto the new ‘Free reference photographs’ section. Each issue we will select one image for Paint. (please note that by doing this you are accepting that your photos are copyright free).

Karen Lawson

‘This is the first time I have tried a wet-in-wet wash and working with speed and really enjoyed it. The poppies turned out a little paler than I'd hoped; probably because I hadn't got the brush dry enough or the pigment deep enough for the second and third applications of colour?’

Claire
‘This painting has a unique freedom. You have managed to achieve the leaves without them becoming too static therefore blending into the painting easily. It is full of movement and fun. I suspect you also painted this on lighter weight paper than 300lb? But even so you have created a wonderful ‘wet-in-wet’ masterpiece! You could try blending the poppies in the foreground to avoid some hard edges. When it is dry, using a little clean water ‘tease’ out some of the hard lines whilst leaving some as they are.’

Liz Littlefair
‘The very wet-in-wet style is not something I have used very often but this inspired me to give it a go. I didn’t have all the colours suggested so I made some adjustments and was quite pleased with the result.’

Claire
‘Well done for trying this approach. Your transition from background to foreground is excellent and subtle. What weight of paper did you use? It looks like it has cockled a little. Heavyweight, say 300lb, is easier for this technique and wetting, but not over-wetting, the paper helps this amount of detail in the first wash. An excellent painting.’

Jyoti Kumar
‘I wanted to paint this in an impressionist style with lots of colours and texture to really capture the busy meadow feel. I used lots of gesso and acrylics plus torn tissues to make the poppies 3D. Overall it makes a very happy painting done with little care to basic rules!’

Claire
‘This painting is inspiring. I am in the depths of a meadow enjoying all the colour and smells of summer with a gentle breeze! The textures have given an added excitement and enhanced the perspective. A variation could include a touch more of the warm yellow amongst the flowers. It is sneaking through in the daisy centres, but could be loosely applied in the first wash to enhance this. This is meant as a suggestion only, as the painting stands well as it is.’

Jane Young
‘I tried working rapidly, to convey the dynamism of the poppies reaching to the sun and ripening their seeds, regardless of any human intervention.’

Claire
‘I love your ‘Red Glory’ painting. It is full of excitement, colour and life. You have captured the tonal values well. A very accomplished painting, strong and confident.’

Jane Tivey
‘I got a bit mixed up between the poppy seeds, poppy heads etc so the colours there are a bit mixed. But as wet-in-wet is my nemesis I didn't think it was too bad!’

Claire
‘All the right ingredients are there. A little more paint and less water in the second part of the first wash, i.e. when the water has dried a little, would have given more mid-ground and therefore a more natural transition to the foreground where the poppies, seeds and poppy heads are so well painted. This is a gentle and pleasing painting. It really is worth persevering with the balance of water and paint to achieve the results.’

CA Blucher-Manning
‘Painted using Claire Warner’s techniques but using the 'Poppies in my Garden' as they are such a beautiful sight and in abundance this year.’

Claire
‘I like the way you have concentrated the poppies into the centre of your painting. The out-of-focus poppies in the background have worked well. I think you may have used some pen work to enhance the foreground leaves and poppies which has described them beautifully.’

Brian Alward
‘I had to paint this as poppies are my sister’s favourite flowers.’

Claire
‘I like the blue sky and the lovely touches of purple in contrast to the yellow greens. This makes for a good colour balance. Watch the little ‘halo’ effect around the main poppy, it is so easy to put one particular colour next to another e.g. green against red, and ‘paint round it’. It is also hard balancing the water versus the paint in this wet-in-wet method. Once the paper is beginning to dry adding some more concentrated pigment before it dries too much is quite a challenge. A lovely painting.’

Jackie Till
‘I have always enjoyed painting flowers, so when I saw this exercise I just had to paint it!’

Claire
‘You have created a lovely composition and movement in this painting. Your ‘out of focus’ pieces are nicely evident and the hint of light tones in the poppies makes them beautifully ‘shapely’. You could be bold and introduce parts of the poppy stems and foliage using this strength of paint and tones to complement these. Watch the hard white lines, and now you have given this a go I hope it will give you the confidence to use this technique again and again.’



TRY YOUR HAND AT

Poppies in
A MEADOW

You tried and here are some of the results

Claire’s painting which featured in the May issue - here is a small selection of your interpretations. To enjoy more click on the Competitions tab.

Thank you to all of you who gave this demonstration a try. The instruction is there for you to follow, but also to use your own interpretation. The results were so impressive. I have chosen these paintings because of their variety of interpretation, not because they were necessarily the best, so please don't be discouraged if yours isn't amongst this group.

If you have any photos for fellow members to paint upload them onto the new ‘Free reference photographs’ section. Each issue we will select one image for Paint. (please note that by doing this you are accepting that your photos are copyright free).

Karen Lawson

‘This is the first time I have tried a wet-in-wet wash and working with speed and really enjoyed it. The poppies turned out a little paler than I'd hoped; probably because I hadn't got the brush dry enough or the pigment deep enough for the second and third applications of colour?’

Claire
‘This painting has a unique freedom. You have managed to achieve the leaves without them becoming too static therefore blending into the painting easily. It is full of movement and fun. I suspect you also painted this on lighter weight paper than 300lb? But even so you have created a wonderful ‘wet-in-wet’ masterpiece! You could try blending the poppies in the foreground to avoid some hard edges. When it is dry, using a little clean water ‘tease’ out some of the hard lines whilst leaving some as they are.’

Liz Littlefair
‘The very wet-in-wet style is not something I have used very often but this inspired me to give it a go. I didn’t have all the colours suggested so I made some adjustments and was quite pleased with the result.’

Claire
‘Well done for trying this approach. Your transition from background to foreground is excellent and subtle. What weight of paper did you use? It looks like it has cockled a little. Heavyweight, say 300lb, is easier for this technique and wetting, but not over-wetting, the paper helps this amount of detail in the first wash. An excellent painting.’



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