Tuition

Working in all Weathers  

You needn’t be beaten by the rain 

PA Alan Goodall trials the new All Weather Wonderpad

I was delighted to have been asked by the SAA to trial the new All Weather Wonderpad. Working outdoors the artist needs to travel light and carrying one pad that is suitable for most media is an excellent idea.

I enjoyed working on the new surface; it has a slight waxy feel with a fine tooth. Although thin in appearance the paper is tough and very responsive to watercolour washes and pen work.

I am well used to drawing and painting en plein air in all weathers, especially in the Lake District where the conditions can be unpredictable. Working in rain, it is impossible for the artist to control watercolour washes, however this new paper does hold the colour well even when soaking wet and it would not be too difficult to produce sketches to work from in the studio.

Gathering information is the key to outdoor work and should the weather turn severe, then utilising this new pad combined with graphite and watercolour pencils would be the answer.  After travelling a long way to a painting spot, I like to gather enough information in the form of sketches and photographs, to produce several finished paintings back in the studio.

I render my sketches in monochrome washes, quickly establishing the lightest and darkest tones and identifying detail in the shadow areas. I often use Winsor & Newton Artists’ Quality Paynes Grey; it has a bluish cast which suits the natural colours of the Lake District as well as coastal and architectural subjects and using one colour certainly speeds up the painting process.

I have represented this scene as a vignette – an effective way of making your finished work look ‘sketchy’.  Although you won’t cover the entire painting surface let your colour washes touch all edges of your painting.

Don’t touch the edges of your paper directly opposite each other – make the painted edges unequal on all sides. 

A late winter’s day at Watendlath, the Lake District 

1I taped down the corners of my paper with masking tape then prepared a line drawing of the scene in 2B pencil. I reduced the height of the trees behind the buildings and added window detail on the white building.

A light pen line was then applied including the outline of a few stones and featuring the corner stones of the buildings. The stream forms a lovely lead into the bridge, our focal point. 

2Next I applied masking fluid to the top of the bridge, the top of the rocks catching the light (the light source coming from the right), and a few stones in the water. The trunk of the tree between the bridge and barn was masked together with a few branches on its left hand side.

3An initial wash of diluted Paynes Grey was applied leaving four corner areas of the painting as white paper. I painted around the white house leaving a light patch for the water beyond the bridge. 

4Now to start building up the initial washes. Paynes Grey dries much lighter than most watercolours and it is essential that the very darks are built up slowly in layers.

Using a No. 4 round brush I applied washes to the buildings, bridge and grassy banks. A second wash was applied to the shadow sides of the buildings and a strong dark wash to the arch underneath the bridge. I also painted washes to the base of the trees and bushes surrounding the white house softening the edge with a damp brush.

5Next I developed the bushes behind the bridge and the conifers using the No. 4 round brush and stronger tones - remember to keep the right hand side of the bushes lighter and make sure that you achieve a good contrast in the tonal areas.

A wash defining the outside edge of the larger tree, behind the white house, was applied and allowed to dry before attempting any detail. I applied a further wash to the arch of the bridge ensuring that this feature remained the darkest element of the picture. 

6I removed all the masking fluid apart from on the stones in the stream. Using a detailer brush I developed the tree structures to the large trees behind the white house, spending time working on the tree between the bridge and barn.

Using counter-change I kept the branches in front of the shadowed wall light and those in front of the sunlit wall dark.

I started building up the shaded sides of the rocks and added window and door details to the buildings. Using a ¾” flat brush I damped the stream area with vertical strokes and slowly built up the reflections, varying the tonal value and again using vertical strokes left a light patch beyond the bridge.

7Finally, I removed the remaining masking fluid from the water area and the stones in the stream and added a few stones in White gouache close to the banks. I then coloured a few stones in the buildings leaving the corner stones light, and suggested a few cast shadows and strengthened the shadow areas beneath the roofs. The outline of the bridge, a few stones and a few joints to the arch stones on the bridge were strengthened with the black waterproof pen.

During this exercise, multi layered watercolour washes were applied and although very damp the paper didn’t cockle.

When adding fine detail, I found the colour stayed put and good tonal values were easily achieved together with both hard and soft edges. Masking fluid was easy to apply and remove with no damage to the surface of the paper.

This pad is a certain asset in damp conditions and it would be a great addition to your materials bag.  

This demonstration was done in the studio in order to capture the step by step stages. To prove that this paper does work in bad weather I drew this sketch (above) and applied watercolour washes in the pouring rain. I also let the paper stand under the rain for an hour to give it a good soaking.

The washes remained on the paper and when the paper was dry I was able to outline the drawing with a black pen - after all the wear and tear the paper still didn't cockle, however I will probably catch my death of cold! 

Alan runs weekly watercolour and sketching classes. Full details can be found on his SAA profile page at www.saa.co.uk or by visiting his web site at www.alangoodall-art.co.uk e-mail: alangoodall.art@btinternet.com Tel: 01924 494375 


Tuition

Working in all Weathers  

You needn’t be beaten by the rain 

PA Alan Goodall trials the new All Weather Wonderpad

I was delighted to have been asked by the SAA to trial the new All Weather Wonderpad. Working outdoors the artist needs to travel light and carrying one pad that is suitable for most media is an excellent idea.

I enjoyed working on the new surface; it has a slight waxy feel with a fine tooth. Although thin in appearance the paper is tough and very responsive to watercolour washes and pen work.

I am well used to drawing and painting en plein air in all weathers, especially in the Lake District where the conditions can be unpredictable. Working in rain, it is impossible for the artist to control watercolour washes, however this new paper does hold the colour well even when soaking wet and it would not be too difficult to produce sketches to work from in the studio.

Gathering information is the key to outdoor work and should the weather turn severe, then utilising this new pad combined with graphite and watercolour pencils would be the answer.  After travelling a long way to a painting spot, I like to gather enough information in the form of sketches and photographs, to produce several finished paintings back in the studio.

I render my sketches in monochrome washes, quickly establishing the lightest and darkest tones and identifying detail in the shadow areas. I often use Winsor & Newton Artists’ Quality Paynes Grey; it has a bluish cast which suits the natural colours of the Lake District as well as coastal and architectural subjects and using one colour certainly speeds up the painting process.

I have represented this scene as a vignette – an effective way of making your finished work look ‘sketchy’.  Although you won’t cover the entire painting surface let your colour washes touch all edges of your painting.

Don’t touch the edges of your paper directly opposite each other – make the painted edges unequal on all sides. 

A late winter’s day at Watendlath, the Lake District 

1I taped down the corners of my paper with masking tape then prepared a line drawing of the scene in 2B pencil. I reduced the height of the trees behind the buildings and added window detail on the white building.

A light pen line was then applied including the outline of a few stones and featuring the corner stones of the buildings. The stream forms a lovely lead into the bridge, our focal point. 

2Next I applied masking fluid to the top of the bridge, the top of the rocks catching the light (the light source coming from the right), and a few stones in the water. The trunk of the tree between the bridge and barn was masked together with a few branches on its left hand side.

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Whether you're just starting out or you've been painting for years, being a

member of the SAA can help to encourage and inspire you for years to come.

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A recent review from a

member

”I heard about the SAA through my Art Group and a friend let me have

some old copies of PAINT magazine to look at. I was immediately impressed with the

articles and the help inside and wrote away for the free sample of the magazine.

Well that clinched it! I joined up the next day and using the easy website began

buying artists materials on their Home Shop. They were much cheaper than other

suppliers.

They send a welcome pack with a hard copy of the catalogue, which

is glossy and a good flick through for selection of materials and DVDs etc. PAINT

magazine is full of helpful and inspiring articles, and I keep my copies close to

hand in my studio for reference.”

Vanessa Bavington

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Alan runs weekly watercolour and sketching classes. Full details can be found on his SAA profile page at www.saa.co.uk or by visiting his web site at www.alangoodall-art.co.uk e-mail: alangoodall.art@btinternet.com Tel: 01924 494375 
[accordions title="" active=3 event="click" collapsible=true disabled=false

autoheight=false]
[accordion title="Read the rest of this article"]

Already a member?

Members Click here to log in

and access the full article.


Not yet a member of the SAA?

Access to the full article is reserved for SAA members only.  If you are

not a member of the SAA, then find

out more about joining here.

As well as

access to this article and more, just some of benefits SAA membership provides

are:

  • The inspirational PAINT magazine delivered for FREE six times a year
  • Interact with like-minded artists and find your place in the UK’s

    largest art community

  • Full access to the PAINT article reference library
  • FREE welcome pack including practical help, advice and gifts
  • Exclusive discounts, member-only offers and FREE P&P on thousands of

    brand name art supplies

Join the worlds biggest and friendliest art society

Whether you're just starting out or you've been painting for years, being a

member of the SAA can help to encourage and inspire you for years to come.

Join today from as little as

£27.50 a year.

A recent review from a

member

”I heard about the SAA through my Art Group and a friend let me have

some old copies of PAINT magazine to look at. I was immediately impressed with the

articles and the help inside and wrote away for the free sample of the magazine.

Well that clinched it! I joined up the next day and using the easy website began

buying artists materials on their Home Shop. They were much cheaper than other

suppliers.

They send a welcome pack with a hard copy of the catalogue, which

is glossy and a good flick through for selection of materials and DVDs etc. PAINT

magazine is full of helpful and inspiring articles, and I keep my copies close to

hand in my studio for reference.”

Vanessa Bavington

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