Oil in a Bar

Winsor & Newton Oilbars

Haidee-Jo Summers, SAA Artist of the Year 2012, gets to grips with Winsor & Newton Oilbars

Haidee-Jo Summers

Winsor and Newton Oilbars are artists' quality oil paints in a stick form. They consist of pigment bound with linseed oil or safflower oil and a wax binder and come in a range of 50 permanent, lightfast, vibrant colours.

You may be surprised when you first see them because they look like giant wax crayons or oil pastels, but when you start to use them you'll discover that they're very different. They really are a hybrid between drawing and painting.

On the outside of the Oilbar the paint forms a skin which means that the bar can be conveniently and comfortably held between the fingers, but on the inside you have wet, fresh oil paint.

Windsor and newton Oilbar

Before you start to work with your Oilbars you need to remove a section of outer skin to expose the paint underneath. You can do this by twisting into a cloth or by peeling it off with your fingers.

They can be used directly on any surface which has been primed for use with oil paints - canvas or canvas board, oil painting paper, any card or hardboard as long as it has been primed.

In my opinion Oilbars are the perfect medium for larger work using gestural, expressive marks and working freely and directly. Broad areas of colour can be covered very quickly. Once applied to your surface you have wet oil paint which you can then work with further in many ways.

Sansodor is a low odour solvent which is used with oil paints in the same way as turps but is less smelly and toxic. After sketching the major shapes and colours directly with the bars I like to use Sansodor applied with a brush to dilute the paint and create washes of colour which you can then allow to run and dribble. You can then blend your colours using your finger, a brush or a rag.

If you want your paint to dribble and run you need to add more solvent (turps or Sansodor).

Any artists’ mediums that can be used with oil paints can be used with oil bars too – for example Liquin, Oil Painting Medium, Fine Detail Medium or Linseed Oil. Oilbars take slightly less time to dry than oil paints, an average of three to four days depending on how thickly you have applied the paint.

You can either apply the Oilbar to canvas and then mix the medium into the paint on the canvas, or alternatively apply the Oilbar to the palette and mix using a palette knife or brush, and then apply to the canvas.

Liquin speeds up the drying times of your paint but all of the mediums increase the flow and the ease with which you can paint finer details or a smoother line. In the same vein if you are mixing your Oilbar colours on the palette they very happily mix with oil paints too. This can be especially useful to know when you're just starting with Oilbars as you may not have a full range of colours to begin with.

I think Oilbars are at their best when used for direct, expressive marks which is why I like to work on a fairly large scale with them and use my whole arm to make a mark. However there are times when a smaller detail or highlight is called for.

To achieve finer detail use a small brush either with oil paints or lift the paint directly from the Oilbar with the brush, adding a little medium to help it flow more smoothly. You can also try lifting the paint directly from the Oilbar with a palette knife and using that to apply to the canvas.

Tip: In the early stages of a piece of work I think it's best to be really experimental because you can decide later which bits you find exciting and would like to keep and which you will work into further. If you're striving for looseness and spontaneity in your work put it in right at the beginning because it's easy to refine it later but hard to do the other way round!

As you build up layers of colour it is also possible to scratch back into the paint with a blade or palette knife, revealing layers of colour underneath.

Oilbars really lend themselves to working on location with a minimum of kit required. A small rucksack containing the Oilbars, a rag, a small bottle of Sansodor and a brush, and a surface to work on are all you need (plus kitchen towel and rubbish bag for the peelings of the outer skins).

Oilbars are ideal for that fast expressive statement. If you need a fresh challenge, consider using Oilbars - it's great to try something new from time to time and push yourself out of your comfort zone. This medium will certainly surprise you and open your eyes to new possibilities.

The starter set of twelve colours would certainly give you a good feel for them, comprising Titanium White, Cadmium Yellow Light, Cadmium Red Medium, French Ultramarine, Ivory Black, Colourless, Alizarin Crimson, Cerulean Blue, Winsor Green, Yellow Ochre, Burnt Sienna and Raw Umber.

To enjoy more paintings by Haidee-Jo and to find out about her workshops and classes visit www.haideejo.com or subscribe to her blog at www.haideejo.blogspot.com

‘Pêche a Pied’ – painted using Winsor & Newton Oilbars

Coble Landing, Filey

1To start with I sketched a pencil outline of the subject onto a canvas board which was already under-painted with Pale Umber Winsor & Newton Galeria acrylic paint and then cut masking tape to fit the highlighted areas that I wanted to keep 'safe'. This would enable me to be freer with the next few stages.

2I started roughly sketching in the blues with Cobalt Blue and Cerulean Blue Hue Oilbars

3I continued working directly with Buff Titanium, Raw Umber, Ivory Black and Burnt Sienna Oilbars

4I then used a brush dipped in Sansodor, and sometimes my fingers, to start to blend the colours in the sky, cliffs and foreground, and used even more Sansodor on the cliffs behind the boats to explore a different texture, letting the Oilbar paint dribble and run.

5I then used Naples Yellow, Titanium White and Cadmium Yellow Deep Winsor & Newton Artists' oil paints, mixed on the palette with Oilbar colours Cadmium Red Medium and Magenta, to paint the white, orange and red areas on the boats, using a fairly small brush. Finally I removed the masking tape and added a few finishing touches


Oil in a Bar

Winsor & Newton Oilbars

Haidee-Jo Summers, SAA Artist of the Year 2012, gets to grips with Winsor & Newton Oilbars

Haidee-Jo Summers

Winsor and Newton Oilbars are artists' quality oil paints in a stick form. They consist of pigment bound with linseed oil or safflower oil and a wax binder and come in a range of 50 permanent, lightfast, vibrant colours.

You may be surprised when you first see them because they look like giant wax crayons or oil pastels, but when you start to use them you'll discover that they're very different. They really are a hybrid between drawing and painting.

On the outside of the Oilbar the paint forms a skin which means that the bar can be conveniently and comfortably held between the fingers, but on the inside you have wet, fresh oil paint.

Windsor and newton Oilbar

Before you start to work with your Oilbars you need to remove a section of outer skin to expose the paint underneath. You can do this by twisting into a cloth or by peeling it off with your fingers.

They can be used directly on any surface which has been primed for use with oil paints - canvas or canvas board, oil painting paper, any card or hardboard as long as it has been primed.

In my opinion Oilbars are the perfect medium for larger work using gestural, expressive marks and working freely and directly. Broad areas of colour can be covered very quickly. Once applied to your surface you have wet oil paint which you can then work with further in many ways.

 

Sansodor is a low odour solvent which is used with oil paints in the same way as turps but is less smelly and toxic. After sketching the major shapes and colours directly with the bars I like to use Sansodor applied with a brush to dilute the paint and create washes of colour which you can then allow to run and dribble. You can then blend your colours using your finger, a brush or a rag.

If you want your paint to dribble and run you need to add more solvent (turps or Sansodor).

Any artists’ mediums that can be used with oil paints can be used with oil bars too – for example Liquin, Oil Painting Medium, Fine Detail Medium or Linseed Oil. Oilbars take slightly less time to dry than oil paints, an average of three to four days depending on how thickly you have applied the paint.

You can either apply the Oilbar to canvas and then mix the medium into the paint on the canvas, or alternatively apply the Oilbar to the palette and mix using a palette knife or brush, and then apply to the canvas.

To enjoy more paintings by Haidee-Jo and to find out about her workshops and classes visit www.haideejo.com or subscribe to her blog at www.haideejo.blogspot.com

‘Pêche a Pied’ – painted using Winsor & Newton Oilbars

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