Our Photo…

Your painting

In March we invited you to paint John Grant’s photo, taken near Dorchester - here is a small selection of your interpretations. To enjoy more click on the Competitions tab.

If you have any photos for fellow members to paint upload them onto the new ‘Free reference photographs’ section. Each issue we will select one image for Paint. (please note that by doing this you are accepting that your photos are copyright free).

Ian Stevenson felt the image needed to be cropped to reduce the 'weight' of the trees to each side whilst retaining enough to act as a 'frame'.

‘I included the roadway to the right bank and a bridge over the river to lead the viewer into the painting.

I also suggested a water mill to add interest to the buildings and added more drama to the sky with a passing rain storm on the distant hillside. The figures on the bridge act as a focal point.’

Ian Stevenson felt the image needed to be cropped to reduce the 'weight' of the trees to each side whilst retaining enough to act as a 'frame'.

Barry Hulme initially tried a close up but then decided to include more sky and open the buildings up to let more light into the picture.

‘I really enjoyed using the picture to try out different options, keep them coming.’

Barry Hulme initially tried a close up but then decided to include more sky and open the buildings up to let more light into the picture.

Susanna Brunskill explains how she has adapted the colour and shapes to emphasize the composition, trying to pick out the main features and lead the eye into the distance.

‘The buildings are larger and a dog-walker has appeared. I thought the photo was a bit too dark and green, but have maybe over-compensated with the lightness and the blue?Your photo? ’

Susanna Brunskill explains how she has adapted the colour and shapes to emphasize the composition, trying to pick out the main features and lead the eye into the distance.

Jonathan Hunter has taken a totally different approach, adding lots of new subjects.

‘I used a more naive style with acrylics as a flat base then outlined all the subjects with a fine waterproof pen. I wanted to show how when you visit a peaceful place it may not be that peaceful after all! Look carefully and you will find me painting.’

Jonathan Hunter has taken a totally different approach, adding lots of new subjects.

L A Sinnett has tried to make the sky more interesting and has cropped the image to give the effect of getting in closer to the main points of interest.
L A Sinnett has tried to make the sky more interesting and has cropped the image to give the effect of getting in closer to the main points of interest.

John Grant's photo and his interpretation of the scene.
John Grant's photo and his interpretation of the scene.



Our Photo…

Your painting

In March we invited you to paint John Grant’s photo, taken near Dorchester - here is a small selection of your interpretations. To enjoy more click on the Competitions tab.

If you have any photos for fellow members to paint upload them onto the new ‘Free reference photographs’ section. Each issue we will select one image for Paint. (please note that by doing this you are accepting that your photos are copyright free).

Ian Stevenson felt the image needed to be cropped to reduce the 'weight' of the trees to each side whilst retaining enough to act as a 'frame'.

‘I included the roadway to the right bank and a bridge over the river to lead the viewer into the painting.

I also suggested a water mill to add interest to the buildings and added more drama to the sky with a passing rain storm on the distant hillside. The figures on the bridge act as a focal point.’

Ian Stevenson felt the image needed to be cropped to reduce the 'weight' of the trees to each side whilst retaining enough to act as a 'frame'.

Barry Hulme initially tried a close up but then decided to include more sky and open the buildings up to let more light into the picture.

‘I really enjoyed using the picture to try out different options, keep them coming.’

Barry Hulme initially tried a close up but then decided to include more sky and open the buildings up to let more light into the picture.



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