PROFILED

Front Cover Artist

Haidee-Jo Summers

Name: Haidee-Jo Summers

Age: 40 Lives: Lincolnshire and Brittany

Medium: Oils

Cover Picture: Fin du Jour

When did painting become a major part of your life?

I always loved drawing and became interested in painting from about 14. I did an arts foundation course in York after leaving school, and then went to Leicester to do a degree in illustration, and while there I won my first oil paints with a self portrait that I entered into a competition on the TV show The Big Breakfast. That's how I got started in oils - until then I was using acrylics, gouache, inks and watercolour.

Cupcake and roses

What inspires you to paint?

It's usually the way light falls on a subject, or an exciting combination of colours, which is why gardens are one of my favourite subjects! Portraits are a major love too but the setting is important to me, whether outside or indoors: it's seeing the person in that particular place that says so much.

When I don't want to go outside I am easily inspired by objects for a still life: serendipity is when one of the cats turn up to pose too!

Epicerie avec les agapanthes

Tell us more about our beautiful front cover?

Fin du jour is one of my favourites. I painted it late last summer while living on the Ile de Brehat in France. I love to chase that magical sparkle on water. It’s so wonderful living on the island and being surrounded by the sea.

People sometimes ask if the lady in the bikini on the beach is me, but not only would it be difficult to paint myself from a long distance, but it would also need a hefty dose of imagination, because I don't look that good in a bikini!

Happy Chappie

You have a blog, on which you do a painting a day - how do you manage that?

It's not easy, and you have to be organised and put aside some time each day, even if it's only an hour. The expression which sums it up is 'If you're hoping to FIND the time, you won't. You need to MAKE the time'.

I've had to work through many technical difficulties with cameras and computers in order to paint and blog, and sometimes it doesn't all come together on the day. I used to be disappointed if I couldn't get a new painting up every day but now I have a better perspective and aim for five or six days a week.

Lola with tete-a-tetes

Find out more about haidee's work

Information about her workshops is on www.haideejo.com You can also become a subscriber to her blog by logging onto www.haideejo.blogspot.com

Do you paint in anything other than oils?

I love to sketch using pens and felt-tips, and for years I painted mainly in acrylics. But I’ve also used watercolours, acrylic ink, gouache, soft pastels, Atelier Interactive acrylics, collage and printmaking. But oils are my staple now.

I was fortunate enough to twice win generous prizes at the Royal Institute of Oil Painters exhibition sponsored by Winsor & Newton and I've been loyal to the brand ever since. I love to paint alla prima usually, in one sitting. I love the creamy, fluid consistency of oils straight from the tube and find they’re the best in terms of convenience and colour mixing.

Painting from the model

Do you paint in situ?

A resounding yes! It's terribly important to me to paint from life, and to get out and paint too. If I've been working in the studio for a week or two I feel really lazy, and know I must get out again in the big wide world - push myself out of my comfort zone. I did that last summer when we were living in France. Everyone comes to the market place to meet friends, buy fish and island-grown vegetables, drink coffee and watch the world go by. I knew it would be good for me to paint there but I was terrified about starting and my French wasn't up to much.

But I pushed myself out there because I knew it would be good for me and I loved it! That market place became my new comfort zone and I could go and paint there any day now. My French improved and I made new friends, plus I sold lots of those oil paintings of the market place and gained commissions to paint houses. If you’re nervous about painting outside in public you just have to do it. It's never as scary as you think.

Do you work from life or photographs?

Union Jack tea party

From life as much as possible but I do use photographs when painting children. I don't just work from one snapshot though, I take hundreds of photos so I can choose up to 30 to actually work from. Of course a sketch is great too - it jogs the memory because you have already looked well at the subject.

How and where do you work best?

Anywhere I can find a subject, with my pochade box filled with oils, on its tripod legs, winter, summer - I don't mind! I like working in the studio too as it means I have the freedom to go larger.

How important is teaching to you?

I'm an artist first and foremost, that's my priority. But I do love to inspire people and get a lot back from sharing my knowledge with all the wonderful students who have become great friends over the years.

I arrange workshops on subjects that please me such as cakes and chocolates, garden and plein air painting - we have great fun!

How do you sell your work?

Either face to face - at exhibitions, shows, markets, by commissions or to collectors - or online at auction. Quite often when a new painting is posted on my blog, www.haideejo.blogspot.com it is put up for auction at the same time. This means that there will be a 'click to bid' link under the picture on the blog. When you click you get redirected to my auction on an American website www.dailypaintworks.com. It works like eBay but is exclusively for paintings.

The auction usually runs for a week and when the painting is dry I ship it off to the winning bidder. Information about her workshops is on www.haideejo.com You can also become a subscriber to her blog by logging onto www.haideejo.blogspot.com

Fin du Jour, oil on canvas 30x20cm, on this issues front cover

PROFILED

Front Cover Artist

Haidee-Jo Summers

Name: Haidee-Jo Summers

Age: 40 Lives: Lincolnshire and Brittany

Medium: Oils

Cover Picture: Fin du Jour

When did painting become a major part of your life?

I always loved drawing and became interested in painting from about 14. I did an arts foundation course in York after leaving school, and then went to Leicester to do a degree in illustration, and while there I won my first oil paints with a self portrait that I entered into a competition on the TV show The Big Breakfast. That's how I got started in oils - until then I was using acrylics, gouache, inks and watercolour.

Cupcake and roses

What inspires you to paint?

It's usually the way light falls on a subject, or an exciting combination of colours, which is why gardens are one of my favourite subjects! Portraits are a major love too but the setting is important to me, whether outside or indoors: it's seeing the person in that particular place that says so much.

When I don't want to go outside I am easily inspired by objects for a still life: serendipity is when one of the cats turn up to pose too!

Do you paint in anything other than oils?

I love to sketch using pens and felt-tips, and for years I painted mainly in acrylics. But I’ve also used watercolours, acrylic ink, gouache, soft pastels, Atelier Interactive acrylics, collage and printmaking. But oils are my staple now.

I was fortunate enough to twice win generous prizes at the Royal Institute of Oil Painters exhibition sponsored by Winsor & Newton and I've been loyal to the brand ever since. I love to paint alla prima usually, in one sitting. I love the creamy, fluid consistency of oils straight from the tube and find they’re the best in terms of convenience and colour mixing.

Painting from the model

[accordions title="" active=3 event="click" collapsible=true disabled=false autoheight=false]
[accordion title="Read the rest of this article"]

Already a member?

Members Click here to log in and access the full article.


Not yet a member of the SAA?

Access to the full article is reserved for SAA members only.  If you are not a member of the SAA, then find out more about joining here.

As well as access to this article and more, just some of benefits SAA membership provides are:

  • The inspirational PAINT magazine delivered for FREE six times a year
  • Interact with like-minded artists and find your place in the UK’s largest art community
  • Full access to the PAINT article reference library
  • FREE welcome pack including practical help, advice and gifts
  • Exclusive discounts, member-only offers and FREE P&P on thousands of brand name art supplies

Join the worlds biggest and friendliest art society

Whether you're just starting out or you've been painting for years, being a member of the SAA can help to encourage and inspire you for years to come.

Join today from as little as £27.50 a year.

A recent review from a member

”I heard about the SAA through my Art Group and a friend let me have some old copies of PAINT magazine to look at. I was immediately impressed with the articles and the help inside and wrote away for the free sample of the magazine. Well that clinched it! I joined up the next day and using the easy website began buying artists materials on their Home Shop. They were much cheaper than other suppliers.

They send a welcome pack with a hard copy of the catalogue, which is glossy and a good flick through for selection of materials and DVDs etc. PAINT magazine is full of helpful and inspiring articles, and I keep my copies close to hand in my studio for reference.”

Vanessa Bavington

[/accordion]

[/accordions]